Guided Tour: Tracing Jewish Life in Oberursel

On Sunday, 26 March 2017, the historian Angelika Rieber once again offers the tour Tracing Jewish life in Oberursel.
In the 90-minute tour around town, Ms. Rieber talks about the history of the Jewish community and  some local Jewish families.

On 19 October 1941, deportations of Jews from Frankfurt began. Within a year, more than 10,000 people were deported and murdered in the extermination camps. Numerous Oberursel residents of Jewish origin did not live to see the end of the Nazi regime and the Second World War.

The city tour is about the integration of Jewish neighbors into the town life, as well as the discrimination and persecution during the Nazi era.

The city tour starts at 2.30 pm at the St. Ursula-Brunnen in the market square and the touring fee is three euros per person.

If you want to know more about Ms. Rieber’s work, or get in contact with her, then visit: http://www.juedisches-leben-frankfurt.de/

The Expat Teacher’s Guide to Buying Property

Jim Rogers, an expat fellow teacher, whom I’ve known for about 20 years, has just published his experience on how to buy property while living overseas.

Guided Tour Camp King, Oberursel on 25 March 2017

On Saturday, 25 March 2017, the guide Sylvia Struck is going to give a tour of the former U.S. military post Camp King in Oberursel.

Mountain Lodge, Camp King Oberursel

The tour covers the history of the area from the Reichssiedlungshof in the 1930s, through the time of the Dulag Luft, up to the end of the U.S. Army presence in 1992.

The meeting point is the Kinderhaus Camp King, Jean-Sauer-Weg 2  at 2 pm, and the tour costs 3 euro.
This is a good opportunity to learn more about the rich history of this area.

Oberursel and its Sister City, Epinay-sur-Seine, France

On Easter 1967, 50 years ago this coming Sunday, the Epinay Square was named after Oberursel’s French partner town, Epinay-sur-Seine. The city partnership between these two cities was barely three years old at that time. Idealism and euphoria of the early years, as well as its humble beginnings at that time, became the foundation for a long-lasting friendship between the two cities.

The 50-year-old place jubilee of the Epinay Square will be held:
Saturday, March 25, 2017, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

The city partnership with Epinay-sur-Seine has been successful and is Oberursel’s oldest sister city. After many years, this alliance is still very active in arranging visits and joint projects.

In the face of  current events and debates about Europe, this event is not run in the form of a regular festival, but is more a rally with speeches, stands, and music. These days, Europe is at a crossroads, and alliances need strengthening.

The rally is organized by the City of Oberursel and the Europa-Union Hochtaunuskreis e.V.

1970s Eateries on the Hohemarkstrasse near Camp King in Oberursel

A blog reader asked me for updates on the eateries on Hohemarkstraße he used to frequent in the 1970s.

He also wondered about several comments about a pizza shop on the corner of the street outside of Camp King. Did that use to be a sausage (bratwurst) place, before it became a pizza shop? 

He continued: I’m interested in finding out, if the pizzeria (outside the main gate, going to the left, towards down town) on the corner is the same place that the bratwurst place was, when I was there. If I didn’t like what we had in the mess hall, I would go outside the main gate for a bratwurst, mustard and a hard roll, if I didn’t go to the enlisted club to eat.

The pizzeria in your article*, I’m sure, is the same shop that was the worst shop in the 1971-73, when I was stationed at Camp King. I remember it was small inside and had small tables were you could stand and eat your sausage & hard roll. Also the shop was on the corner.
 
I was able to locate two eateries (a former drinking place and a current one), sitting at the corner of two streets off of Hohemarkstraße. The first one is this one at the right. The address is Hohemarkstraße 117.
When we came here in 1995, it was a drinking place run by a Greek immigrant. It closed about 2005, when the owner passed away. At the moment, it is an ice-cream parlor.
Driving up Hohemarkstraße, towards the hills and the sunset, you see a long yellow building along the road. This is where the former Camp King Post, now German settlement, begins.

A close-up of the same Eiscafé.

At another corner of Hohemarkstraße and Im Heidegraben, this building houses a shop facing Hohemarkstraße. Around the corner, there is this Treffpunkt (Meeting Point), where the local denizens of drink hang out. This kind of establishment is also called a Trinkhalle (tiny drinking place, in general).

Do the buildings spark any memories? If so, please let me know.