Converting Your German Driver’s License to an EU Standard License

If you have an older German driver’s license (one without the expiration date), it has to be exchanged for the new EU standard license. This goes for the grey, pink and older plastic driver’s licenses.

If your license was issued before 31 Dec 1998, it must be exchanged as follows:

Born before 1953 – exchanged by 10 Jan 2033
Born 1953 – 1958 – before 19 Jan 2021
Born 1959 – 1964 – before 19 Jan 2022
Born 1965 – 1970 – before 19 Jan 2023
Born 1971 or after – before 19 Jan 2024

If your license was issued as of 1 Jan 1999, it must be exchanged as follows:

Issued 1999 – 2000 – exchanged before 19 Jan 2025
2001 – 2002 – before 19 Jan 2026
2003 – 2004 – before 19 Jan 2027
2005 – 2006 – before 19 Jan 2028
2007 – 2008 – before 19 Jan 2029
2009 – before 19 Jan 2030
2010 – before 10 Jan 2031
2011 – before 19 Jan 2032
2012 – 18 Jan 2013 – before 19 Jan 2033

driver’s license: (German: der Führerschein)

Have a look at Bußgeldkatalog – Führerschein umschreiben (in German) to learn what you need to do next.

Autumn Impressions from Germany

“Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower.”

– Albert Camus

Fall and snowy winters are my favorite seasons. This year’s fall has come a bit later after we had a rather lengthy summer with a drought.

I love to see the blankets of leaves, which I don’t have to rake. I enjoy foggy mornings while having coffee on the balcony. Then we might have clear blue skies a.k.a. Indian summer (German: Altweibersommer = old women’s summer), when the yellow leaves are so bright against the deep blue sky. Autumn is full of change.

If time allows, I take morning walks through the nearby forest.

Herbststimmung im Wald.

Another pretty sight in downtown Bad Homburg.

Amber-colored leaves

A Japanese maple in the sunshine

A dog rose bush  providing tasty berries for Hagebuttenmarmelade (rose bush jam). When I was younger, this type of jam was available in supermarkets  only between November and late spring. I suppose they have it year-round nowadays.

Against dreary November skies, a cup of hot mulled wine (German: Glühwein) might help in the evening. 🙂 With the mostly sunny days we’ve had, MY Glühwein bottle is still unopened.

When to Harvest and Plant Lily of the Valley from Seed Pods

The best time to harvest lily in the valley seed pods is in late summer, and the best time to plant is in late fall.

In early September of this year, I cut off the shriveled lily of the valley seed pods and left them in a bowl for decoration – until today.

In a previous post, I had written about How to grow Lily of the Valley on the Balcony. The tiny red berries were my harvest.

Lily of the valley and rose seed pods, and scarlet runner beans

Before cutting the seed pods, I left them in warm water for an hour. With one recycled plastic bag (serving as gloves) on each hand, and some sturdy paper underneath, I propped open the seed pods with a very sharp knife. Be careful as the flesh and juice are poisonous. At first, I was careful not to cut too deeply into the seed pods, but there was no need. These little light brown seeds are very sturdy.

Once you’ve cut them open, they should be planted right away. It will take several years for them to grow flowers.

Lily of the Valley seed pods

I planted them 1/4 inch deep in a big planter (at least six inches or 15 cm in height).

Armistice Day 2018 at FIS, Oberursel

At 11 o’clock on 11 November,  the Frankfurt International School (FIS) commemorated the centenary of Armistice Day. In addition to staging dance, drama, spoken poetry, orchestral and choral performances, FIS exhibited some artifacts that were contributed by members of the school community.

The uniform and cavalry sabre of Engelbert Seufert appears below, along with a wedding portrait with his wife, Veronika, and her memorial to his falling in battle on 9 June 1918. Engelbert Seufert was my paternal grandmother’s first husband.

Students displayed the artifacts in the exhibition and answered questions about their historical context and significance.

armistice: der Waffenstillstand (German)

Memorial Service: 80 Years After the November Pogrome

Invitation to a district-wide memorial service to observe the 80th anniversary of the pogroms of November 1938

On Friday, 9 November 2018, in front of city hall in Oberursel (Taunus), a service will be held to memorialize the Jewish population of the Hochtaunus who were victims of the pogroms of November 1938.

14:00 General information about the memorial activities for Jewish victims of Nazi persecution in the Hochtaunus

14:30 Beginning of the Hour of Remembrance

15:30 Walk to the monument dedicated to the Jewish residents of Oberursel who were victims of National Socialism

16:00 End of service

If you plan to attend, then sign up with one of the contacts listed below .

  • kultur@hochtaunuskreis.de
  • Tel: 06172 – 999 4610
  • Fax: 06172 – 999 9811

This is organized by the Gesellschaft für Christlich-Jüdische Zusammenarbeit Hochtaunus e.V. (GCJZ Hochtaunus) in cooperation with the Hochtaunuskreis.

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