Altkönig Statue at Camp King Oberursel

In August of this year, one of the members of the B-17 delegation asked me about the significance of this statue, Altkönig (Lit: old king).  All I could tell her was the inscription left by the artist, Inga Dilcher-Hassenstein, who donated her piece of art to the city of Oberursel in 1998, and then found its permanent spot in Camp King in 2004.

Now, who is the ‘Altkönig’? In its original form, the Altkönig is the third highest mountain of the Taunus range in Hesse, Germany, reaching 798 metres above sea level. Around 400 BC, the Celts settled on the Altkönig Mountain, built the Heidetrank Oppidum, as well as several ring walls around the summit, which are still present.

This is the only information I could find in regards to the statue’s namesake.

The statue is part of a little rest area adjacent to the former Officers’ Club (Mountain Lodge).

Der Altkönig

Inga Dilcher-Hassenstein – 1975  Ms. Inga Dilcher-Hassenstein ( Name of the artist and date presented)

Geschenk an die Stadt Oberursel -1998  (Presented to the city of Oberursel in 1998)

St. Ursula Church Tower Museum in Oberursel

The St. Ursula Church tower museum presents a collection of sacral Art, spanning over 500 years of parish history.

In addition, the museum visitor gets to enjoy a splendid view not only across the Altstadt, but the whole town, and all the way to the Taunus (to the west), Odenwald (to the south), Spessart (to the east), and Vogelsberg (to the north).

Museum visiting hours:

From May – September: every first Saturday 15:00 – 17:00

Entrance fee: 1,50 € for adults, 1,00 € for children.

For arranging a tour on Mondays or Fridays, please send an inquiry to Mr.Abt.

Address: St. Ursula-Gasse in 61440 Oberursel (Taunus)
You can contact Mr. Wilfried Abt for more information
Telephone: (0 61 71) 55 05 0
e-mail: henrich@table-individuelle.de
http://www.kath-oberursel.de

Oberursel near the Taunus Feldberg Mountain

German word of the Day: die Umleitung

If you come to live in Oberursel, you’ll find yourself right in the middle between Frankfurt City (35 minutes by train) and the Feldberg Mountain (20 minutes by car).

Two days ago, the mountain had its first heavy snowfall and due to Eisbruch (ice disintegration) and tree branches falling off,  an Umleitung (detour) sign had to be put up.

Umleitung Feldberg

Feldberg Ast Dez 2014

This is what I call Winter Wonderland.

Feldberg Schnee Dez 2014

These photos were taken by @Bernd Lokki Peppler, published with his friendly permission.

Safe Drinking Water in Oberursel

Stadtwerke Oberursel supply high quality drinking water from the tap

Over the years, many expats have come to live in Oberursel. Some come from countries where only bottles water is considered safe drinking water and are really surprised to learn that in Oberursel, we can drink the water straight from the tap.

Forty-five years ago, on exactly the 1st of January 1968, the Stadtwerke Oberursel Taunus GmbH (Municipal Utilities, est. 1967) took over the water supply in Oberursel. Since then, the Stadtwerke Oberursel represents a safe and reliable provision of the number one resource – drinking water of high quality.

About 80% of Oberursel’s drinking water comes from the Haidtränktal, and its level is rated “soft” in accordance with the current Detergent and Cleansing Agents Acts. 15% of  Oberursel’s drinking water originates from the waterworks Riedwiese, and around 5% of Oberursel’s drinking water needs are covered by the Water Procurement Association of the Taunus area. The latter two water supplies are rated “hard”. As drinking water is the most important and best-controlled resource, it regularly undergoes quality control and is analyzed in accredited laboratories. Each year, 200 water samples are taken from the Oberursel water production plants, containers, and pipe network.

To ensure a safe and reliable drinking water supply, Oberursel provides a 295-kilometer long pipeline network. The Stadtwerke staff monitors, renews, extends and maintains these pipes. This way, optimal safety is ensured. In 2012, 38 new water connections were created, and a total of 86 water connections were renewed. A total of 501 meters of water supply lines were re-laid or renewed.

Wasserwerke Oberursel

Wasserwerke Oberursel

Drinking water from the tap in Germany is better than store-bought mineral water. The Stiftung Warentest, an agency which measures and evaluates safety and quality of consumer products and service, regularly arrives at this conclusion. Bottled still water often has fewer minerals, but more germs than tap water. Additionally, drinking water is very affordable: For €1.20, you can draw one liter of fresh tap drinking water each day for an entire year. For the same money, you can only buy six bottles of mineral water from a discount store (source: O-TON magazine Stadtwerke Oberursel, issue 1/2013).

Advantages:

* Much lower cost

* Better Safety and Health

* Home delivery into your kitchen

* No storage space needed

* No bottles to return

 

Vocabulary:

das Leitungswasser (tap water)

das Mineralwasser (mineral water)

stilles Wasser (still mineral water) + spritziges Wasser (sparkling water)

Ordering water at the restaurant:

A: “Ich hätte gerne eine Flasche Wasser.” (I’d like to have a bottle of water)

B: “Stilles oder spritziges?” (Still water or sparkling water?)

A: “Stilles, bitte.” (…)

Mister Camp King

On 1 August, the American Los Angeles Times journalist and book author, Annie Jacobsen, came to Camp King Oberursel to do research for her forthcoming book.

Her previous book, Area 51: An Uncensored History of America’s Top Secret Military Base, was on the New York Times Best Seller list for 14 weeks.

Initially, while doing research via the internet and other sources, she came upon my blog posts about Camp King and found what she was looking for – Mister Camp King a.k.a. Manfred Kopp, our local Camp King Historian.

It only took a few more mails to set up our meeting in Oberursel.

Mr. Kopp and the Taunus Zeitung reporter

When she first arrived at Camp King, she took us out to lunch at the local pizzeria, followed by a tour through Camp King. Mr. Kopp also had the keys for the Mountain Lodge, so we got to take a look inside. Yes, something is actually being done, I saw paint buckets in the corner!

Mister Camp King with Annie Jacobsen

The Taunus Zeitung had sent its reporter, Ms. Takim, and a photographer as well.

Inside the Mountain Lodge

After the interview with the paper, we then proceeded to head on to Schloss Kransberg (a 30-minute drive to Usingen). Due to Annie’s arrival, she had obtained permission to visit the castle from the current owners. Jan Herrmanns, the building and grounds manager, gave us a tour.

Schloss Kransberg near Usingen

It was interesting to be standing in Göring’s office. More about that in another post.

Note: The Taunus Zeitung published the article about Annie’s visit today, see Auf der Suche nach Geheimem.

 

 

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