Quote of the Day

The best teachers teach from the heart, not from the book.

~ Unknown

weeping willow

weeping willow

This weeping willow (German: die Trauerweide) is growing very nicely on our balcony.

Annie Jacobsen and Operation Paperclip – Book Research in Germany

In the summer of 2012, the author Annie Jacobsen sent me an e-mail inquiring whether she could meet Mr. Kopp, our Camp King Historian, and me on her trip to Germany the following month.

She came to do her research on Nazi Germany for her book Operation Paperclip, and then the three of us toured various sites together. She initially had asked me to function as her interpreter, which was not necessary, because Mr Kopp’s English is close to fluent. For our warm-up session and discussing the day’s agenda, we started out at our local pizzeria :-).

Ms Jacobsen and Mr Kopp

Ms Jacobsen and Mr Kopp

Ms Jacobsen in front of the Mountain Lodge, Oberursel

Ms Jacobsen in front of the Mountain Lodge, Oberursel

 

More about Ms Jacobsen’s visit in August 2012 here at: A Visit to Schloss Kransberg.

This book is also available on amazon.com: Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America

Mr. Kopp just sent me a note, reminding me of Operation Paperclip having gotten published on 11 Feb of this year. And we were both mentioned in her acknowledgements on page 665.

Thanks for the mention, Annie. We had an interesting day with you as well.

First English Book Case in Frankfurt

Sharing the newsletter sent out by the English Theatre Frankfurt on 30 October 2013.

Quoting:

On Thursday 24th October 2013, the English Theatre Frankfurt (ETF) opened Europe’s first public book case exclusively for books written in English.

Our guests of honor were Lord Mayor Peter Feldmann and the former Mayor of Cultural Affairs, Hilmar Hoffmann, among other wonderful friends of the ETF.

Take a look at the opening with the ensemble of Saturday Night Fever and our Lord Mayor: http://www.flickr.com/photos/69838251@N05/sets/72157636930213096/

The book case works like this:

People are invited to leave books for others to take, like a book exchange in a public space. We believe this will work splendidly in front of our main entrance, as the performances draw not only thousands of teachers and students but also native speakers who live and work in Frankfurt as well as people who are generally interested in the English language.

The ETF has taken on the responsibility for the book case. Our staff will make sure that the book case is clean and that there are no inappropriate books on display.

Please join us in launching our book case by bringing an English book with you to the previews of Saturday Night Fever, or when passing by the theatre. Whether it’s a classroom favorite or a personal favorite, your book will help make the first English book case in Frankfurt a success.

Please pass this message on to your friends who might want to contribute to the first public book case IN ENGLISH.

“The young need discipline and a full bookcase”

– Vivienne Westwood –

– end of quote –

Mister Camp King

On 1 August, the American Los Angeles Times journalist and book author, Annie Jacobsen, came to Camp King Oberursel to do research for her forthcoming book.

Her previous book, Area 51: An Uncensored History of America’s Top Secret Military Base, was on the New York Times Best Seller list for 14 weeks.

Initially, while doing research via the internet and other sources, she came upon my blog posts about Camp King and found what she was looking for – Mister Camp King a.k.a. Manfred Kopp, our local Camp King Historian.

It only took a few more mails to set up our meeting in Oberursel.

Mr. Kopp and the Taunus Zeitung reporter

When she first arrived at Camp King, she took us out to lunch at the local pizzeria, followed by a tour through Camp King. Mr. Kopp also had the keys for the Mountain Lodge, so we got to take a look inside. Yes, something is actually being done, I saw paint buckets in the corner!

Mister Camp King with Annie Jacobsen

The Taunus Zeitung had sent its reporter, Ms. Takim, and a photographer as well.

Inside the Mountain Lodge

After the interview with the paper, we then proceeded to head on to Schloss Kransberg (a 30-minute drive to Usingen). Due to Annie’s arrival, she had obtained permission to visit the castle from the current owners. Jan Herrmanns, the building and grounds manager, gave us a tour.

Schloss Kransberg near Usingen

It was interesting to be standing in Göring’s office. More about that in another post.

Note: The Taunus Zeitung published the article about Annie’s visit today, see Auf der Suche nach Geheimem.

 

 

Facts and Observations about Germany

The following book offers some hard facts about Germany. Well, published in 2010, there is no need to fear for it to be outdated as Germans are slow to change.

On the other hand, you can also read Margit’s post about 10 Things I like about Germany, which are based on her experience and observations.

I know, I should write my own list of things I like about Germany, which do not differ much from Margit’s post. But for a living, I have to explain the Germans’ quirks and other traits. My job, next to teaching, is also problem-solving. Some expats have a lot of questions when dealing with German neighbors and life in Germany, in general.

Once my head is free of all these interesting challenges, I shall write my own list.