Guided Tour Camp King, Oberursel on 25 March 2017

On Saturday, 25 March 2017, the guide Sylvia Struck is going to give a tour of the former U.S. military post Camp King in Oberursel.

Mountain Lodge, Camp King Oberursel

The tour covers the history of the area from the Reichssiedlungshof in the 1930s, through the time of the Dulag Luft, up to the end of the U.S. Army presence in 1992.

The meeting point is the Kinderhaus Camp King, Jean-Sauer-Weg 2  at 2 pm, and the tour costs 3 euro.
This is a good opportunity to learn more about the rich history of this area.

Oberursel and its Sister City, Epinay-sur-Seine, France

On Easter 1967, 50 years ago this coming Sunday, the Epinay Square was named after Oberursel’s French partner town, Epinay-sur-Seine. The city partnership between these two cities was barely three years old at that time. Idealism and euphoria of the early years, as well as its humble beginnings at that time, became the foundation for a long-lasting friendship between the two cities.

The 50-year-old place jubilee of the Epinay Square will be held:
Saturday, March 25, 2017, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

The city partnership with Epinay-sur-Seine has been successful and is Oberursel’s oldest sister city. After many years, this alliance is still very active in arranging visits and joint projects.

In the face of  current events and debates about Europe, this event is not run in the form of a regular festival, but is more a rally with speeches, stands, and music. These days, Europe is at a crossroads, and alliances need strengthening.

The rally is organized by the City of Oberursel and the Europa-Union Hochtaunuskreis e.V.

1970s Eateries on the Hohemarkstrasse near Camp King in Oberursel

A blog reader asked me for updates on the eateries on Hohemarkstraße he used to frequent in the 1970s.

He also wondered about several comments about a pizza shop on the corner of the street outside of Camp King. Did that use to be a sausage (bratwurst) place, before it became a pizza shop? 

He continued: I’m interested in finding out, if the pizzeria (outside the main gate, going to the left, towards down town) on the corner is the same place that the bratwurst place was, when I was there. If I didn’t like what we had in the mess hall, I would go outside the main gate for a bratwurst, mustard and a hard roll, if I didn’t go to the enlisted club to eat.

The pizzeria in your article*, I’m sure, is the same shop that was the worst shop in the 1971-73, when I was stationed at Camp King. I remember it was small inside and had small tables were you could stand and eat your sausage & hard roll. Also the shop was on the corner.
 
I was able to locate two eateries (a former drinking place and a current one), sitting at the corner of two streets off of Hohemarkstraße. The first one is this one at the right. The address is Hohemarkstraße 117.
When we came here in 1995, it was a drinking place run by a Greek immigrant. It closed about 2005, when the owner passed away. At the moment, it is an ice-cream parlor.
Driving up Hohemarkstraße, towards the hills and the sunset, you see a long yellow building along the road. This is where the former Camp King Post, now German settlement, begins.

A close-up of the same Eiscafé.

At another corner of Hohemarkstraße and Im Heidegraben, this building houses a shop facing Hohemarkstraße. Around the corner, there is this Treffpunkt (Meeting Point), where the local denizens of drink hang out. This kind of establishment is also called a Trinkhalle (tiny drinking place, in general).

Do the buildings spark any memories? If so, please let me know.

German Word for the Day: die Waldeinsamkeit

Waldeinsamkeit (lit: forest solitude) stands for the feeling of being alone in the woods, but it also implies our connection to nature and the universe.

Erst im Wald kam alles zur Ruhe in mir, meine Seele wurde ausgeglichen und voller Macht.

– – Knut Hamsun

It was only in the forest that everything came to rest, my soul became balanced and full of strength.

U.S. Air Force Radio Relay Site near Camp King in Oberursel, Germany

This afternoon, we drove for about 20 minuten to the Kolbenberg Mountain, which is part of the Taunus Mountain region and the Taunus Nature Park. It borders the towns of Oberursel to the southeast, Schmitten to the northwest, and Bad Homburg to the southeast.

Radio Relay Site Kolbenberg, Germany

The Kolbenberg is about 690m in height, compared to the Feldberg with 890m.

The reason for this trip was one of my blog readers, who had the following question: Could you tell me the name of the of the small U.S. Air Force station above Camp King. We would go up there to their enlisted club to watch the American (military) TV channel that we didn’t have on Camp King. I remember a few soldiers talking about using the Air Force station to call home using their radio system.

On the summit of the Kolbenberg, there is a large telecommunication system with a visible lattice mast, which was used  by the U.S. Air Force until 2007. Since the withdrawal of the U.S. military, the mast has been used by civilian radio services, including mobile radio.

Barbwire around the Kolbenberg Radio Relay Site

Far into the 1950s, there was also a ground radar station for the MGM-1 Matador (Matador Missile), which was a radio-controlled cruise missile stationed in West Germany during the Cold War. In the event of a launch, the missile was remote-controlled by ground-mounted radar stations, such as the one on the Kolbenberg.

The plant was rebuilt and expanded over the years. In 1962, the lattice mast was finished. At first it was painted red and white. The lattice mast is about 100 m high and can be seen clearly from far away. Since that time, the system was only used as a radio relay site. At peak times, 20 to 25 antennas were mounted on the lattice mast, often called “dishes” by the American soldiers because they looked like soup bowls.

From the station, signals were sent northwards to Obernkirchen / Schwarzenborn, east to the Wasserkuppe and southeast to Breitsol / Geiersberg. To the southwest, signals were sent to Wiesbaden, to the north-east in the direction of Stein. Those for Rhine-Main Airbase and Darmstadt were sent to the south. Towards the west, Donnersberg was signalled.

The plant was officially called the “Feldberg Radio Relay Site”. This often caused confusion because there was also a broadcasting system in the Black Forest on the Feldberg. In the local vernacular, the station is also called “Sandplacken” or “Kolbenberg”.

In the 1960s, a part of today’s existing station was enclosed by a simple wood fence. At that time about 20 employees of the U.S. Air Force were stationed there. Most of them worked in the “Telephone Switching Center”. In 1969, up to 150 personnel were on the ground, among them communication personnel, four cooks in the canteen, as well as five in the administrative section. The personnel lived in specially built barracks directly on the premises. At the beginning of the 1970s, soldiers set up a small club with a mini-cinema on the ground floor of the barracks. At the same time, the wooden fence was replaced by a wire one.

Guard-house at the Kolbenberg Site, Germany

In the mid-1980s, terrorist threat in Germany from groups like the Red Army Faction (RAF) rose sharply. As the largest radio relay site in Europe was located on the Kolbenberg, a wall about 5 m high was built around the station. The barrier did not allow any view into the station’s interior, and the access through the walls were built so that in the event of a breakthrough with vehicles, the station could not be damaged. At this time, the barracks on the site had to be given up, probably because of space limitations. The soldiers then resided at Camp King in Oberursel.

Kolbenberg

The last employee of the U.S. Air Force left the station in 1993. From then on, it ran self-sufficiently and was remote-controlled by the Rhein-Main Airbase. Maintenance work and monitoring took place at regular intervals. On the Kolbenberg, there were never any underground facilities or bunkers. This was often claimed because of a translation error on a site map published on different pages and forums in the Internet. Only the water tank was covered with grass.

Since 2007, a telecommunications service company has rented parts of the plant and installed antennas on the grating mast, connected to a separate cable line. Various cable thieves and vandals have already discovered the premises and left visible traces. The current owner is unknown.

The US soldiers stationed on Kolbenberg (at times, up to 150 soldiers) were popular among the locals. They also gave their technical support  in the construction of a number of facilities in the neighboring towns. For example, they helped build the bobsleigh track in Oberreifenberg, the Schutzhütte (mountain hut) called Kittelhütte (same name as the mountain pass), and the sports field in Niederreifenberg.

After the withdrawal of the U.S. troops, a memorial stone with a copper plate was erected about 200 meters west of the Kastell Old Hunting House near the Sandplacken mountain pass, with which the US soldiers express their gratitude.

The memorial plaque was stolen in August 2011. Thanks to the sponsoring by a local company, a new one was added in March 2012.

The memorial reads:

From all of the American military personnel who were stationed on this mountain top since World War II, we would like to express our gratitude to the citizens of the surrounding communities who so openly accepted us and made our stay in Germany so memorable and enjoyable. Thank you.