German Word of the Day: der Handwerker

If you are new to Germany, you might wonder why repairs take that long. I’m German, but sometimes I wonder about it, too.

Let’s draw the shades on this repair job soon.

On 19 September, our window shutter belt (Rollogurt) tore apart after 18 years of use. I called a couple of companies, and one of them offered an appointment (just to assess the damage) three weeks down the road. The next one offered to come the following Monday. Hurray, I thought.

When the repairman came, he told me this outer roller shutter (Außenrollo) is much harder to repair. Since the Rollo could not be pulled up more than 4 inches/10 cm, there would be no way to reach the outer box without breaking the roller shutter (Rolladenpanzer) . In addition, being on the fourth floor of the building, this would also require a second repair man for security reason.

In my mind, I saw the charges adding up. Finally, these roller shutters need to be ordered from another company, as they do not keep them in stock.

I got my estimate on 24 September of € 687,82 with a note that additional charges (unforeseen at this point) might incur. I placed the job order.

On 17 October, I made a friendly inquiry to the Rollo company to see how far down the line we were on the waiting list. My friendly inquiry got a defensive reply, ‘I told you we would call you as soon as the part(s) have come in.’

It has been five weeks today. We are still without a Rollo, and I suppose the part hasn’t even arrived yet. It takes a lot of patience to be at the mercy of getting jobs done by repairmen (Handwerker) in Germany.

I’m sure some neighbors might find it odd, and speculate what’s going on behind these blinds. Not much, I can tell you. We are also in the dark about it. 🙂 Anyway, at this rate, I hope to get this done by Christmas.

Oktoberfest Breakfast in Oberursel

As we were giving our friend from Texas a little tour through Oberursel this past weekend, I noticed this sign outside the ‘Brauhaus Oberursel’.

Where else but in Germany can you get a Marktfrühstück (market breakfast), which includes a couple of Weißwürste (Bavarian veal sausages), a Pretzel, and a 1/2 L of beer (a pint).

No, this wasn’t for us. We opted for a Bratwurst-to-go from the market square vendor instead.

Their special Oktoberfest menu runs through 13 October 2019.

The Mountain Lodge, Oberursel in September 2019

This is a visual tour of the Mountain Lodge and its surroundings. Since the first tenants/owners moved in around 2015, not much has been written about this historic building.

Mountain Lodge Oberursel
Mountain Lodge Oberursel

Coming down on the right side of the building, towards the meadows.

The chapel (center) is still there.

Yes, and there is some graffiti too.

Oberursel Photo Calendar 2020

As I am about to prepare a care package with local souvenirs for our daughter in Tallahassee, FL, I ran across this picturesque photo calendar.

With Oberursel being an expat town of its own kind, there are plenty of residents who come and go, including my own family. This makes it a great souvenir for anybody who has ever lived here.

I bought this calendar for € 12,95 at the newsagent Tabak Carree Rhode at Camp King, Oberursel.

Photos and Design by Petrus Bodenstaff, a taxi driver from Frankfurt.

A Stroll Through Oberursel Old Town

The historical part of town of Oberursel is usually referred to as the Altstadt by Germans. We had another out-of-town visitor, and a trip to the Biergarten included walking back to the parking area An der Bleiche (At the Bleaching Grounds). In the old days, women washed and sun bleached the sheets right there.

St. Ursula Church

 

The Witches Path, Oberursel

It’s an old tradition around here that when a baby is born, the family hangs out baby clothing to announce its arrival.

 

 

Old and new can stand very close together.

We have arrived at our destination:  the parking lot An der Bleiche.

This fountain woman represents the women from long ago, who used to bring their laundry to this area – the washing and bleaching got done here.

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