The Mountain Lodge, Oberursel in September 2019

This is a visual tour of the Mountain Lodge and its surroundings. Since the first tenants/owners moved in around 2015, not much has been written about this historic building.

Mountain Lodge Oberursel
Mountain Lodge Oberursel

Coming down on the right side of the building, towards the meadows.

The chapel (center) is still there.

Yes, and there is some graffiti too.

A Stroll Through Oberursel Old Town

The historical part of town of Oberursel is usually referred to as the Altstadt by Germans. We had another out-of-town visitor, and a trip to the Biergarten included walking back to the parking area An der Bleiche (At the Bleaching Grounds). In the old days, women washed and sun bleached the sheets right there.

St. Ursula Church

 

The Witches Path, Oberursel

It’s an old tradition around here that when a baby is born, the family hangs out baby clothing to announce its arrival.

 

 

Old and new can stand very close together.

We have arrived at our destination:  the parking lot An der Bleiche.

This fountain woman represents the women from long ago, who used to bring their laundry to this area – the washing and bleaching got done here.

Wash Your Honey Jars Before Drop-Off at the Bottle Recycling Point

Our local beekeepers have  issued the following reminder: Do not dump unwashed honey jars into the Glass Recycle Containers. Rinse them out really well.

Any honey remnant left in the jar can contribute to the transference of the

  • Amerikanische Faulbrut (German)
  • Paenibacillus larvae (Latin)
  • American Foulbrood

which is one of the most detrimental bacterial bee diseases of its kind on a global scale. 80 – 90% of all imported honey contains spores of this disease, which is an additional threat to our local bee population.

Please rinse the jars very carefully before dropping them in the container.

The next step is:  the introduction of the requirement that imported honey be analyzed to detect the possible presence of American Foulbrood bacteria.

3 Things You Should Not Do on Good Friday in Germany

Social Media in Germany is full of debates again about our Good Friday (Karfreitag) rules, and what we can do and not do. In general, Good Friday is just one of a few public holidays, when silence needs to be observed. See Wiki for a list of ‘Quiet Holidays in Germany’.

The quiet days vary from state to state, and the state of Berlin seems to be the most relaxed about its Feiertagsruhe.

The following public places will be closed to observe this rule of silence:

Discos, clubs, sport events, open markets, circuses, fairs, theatres, opera houses, game centers, promotional events;

On a personal level, you may not:

  1. Dance to any kind of music in the public
  2. Wash your car
  3. Move to another location

… and if you are in Bavaria, you should most definitely not air out your bedding on Good Friday.

On a personal note, many years ago, we had traveled to northern Bavaria to visit my side of the family. We stayed at my brother’s house, and I saw the need for a good shake of the bedding which had not been used for many months. A neighbor chided me from across the street, “Maria, das macht man doch nicht am Karfreitag! Das bringt den Tod ins Haus!” (Don’t do this on Good Friday, it will bring death into your home!) I gave the bedding a final shake, and brought it in.

This was so strange after having just moved here from a country like Japan, where so many things are 24/7, and religious beliefs become a medley on holidays anyway.

There is little more contradictory than superstitious beliefs from pious country folk on Good Friday.

List of Expensive Verbal Insults for Drivers in Germany

So you think your German is not good enough to insult others, well, your hand gesture (the middle finger, e.g.) might be enough for you to be fined by the authorities.

Against common belief, there is no difference in whether you insult a police offer or any other person on the street, the charges remain the same. The charge only differs based on the offender’s income and social standing.

For example, a few years back, a famous German soccer player was fined € 10.000 for calling someone an ‘Arschloch’. An average worker would have gotten away with a much lower fine.

This is a shortlist of the most common insults, which come with a €1.000 fine:

  • “Arschloch”, “Drecksau”
  • “Wichser”, “Scheißwichser”
  • “Blöde Schlampe”, “alte Schlampe”
  • “Schlampen, ihr elendigen!”
  • “Sie haben den totalen Knall”
  • Sie sind “blöd im Kopf”
  • “Verbrecherin”, “blöde Kuh”
  • “Arschloch” plus showing the middle finger

Insults are not a trivial offense, but a criminal one, based on German law. This can lead to hefty fines or imprisonment.

On the other hand, the statements/name calling listed below remain free of charge:

  • “Sie können mich mal …”
  • “Oberförster”, “Wegelagerer” oder “Komischer Vogel” to a  police officer
  • “Leck mich am Arsch!” (if used around the Stuttgart area)
  • “Das ist doch Korinthenkackerei” (when arguing about a parking ticket)
  • “Parkplatzschwein” to a person parking in a non-parking zone.

Source: German ADAC – March 2019

Avoid road rage (lovely long German term: im Straßenverkehr ausbrechender Jähzorn), and keep cool.

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