The ‘Goat Farm’ on Camp King, Oberursel

There has never been a ‘goat farm’ on Camp King in Oberursel, hence the quotation marks. The U.S. soldiers stationed there liked to refer to this piece of land, with just one mean goat, as the ‘goat farm’.

One of my readers, a former soldier stationed there from 1966 to 1968, wanted to know what happened to the goat farm. I asked someone who would know, our historian Manfred Kopp, and this is what he had to say.

There has never been a goat farm.

The School of Agriculture (Siedlungshof) hosted a big array of chickens, rabbits and some sheep. On the sheep meadow, right next to the prison camp, the POW prisoners were allowed to do sports, especially soccer. The meadow was not secured by barbwire, unlike the camp itself.

On this meadow, there was a small hutch with a goat,  notorious for its aggression towards the prisoners. One incident made this goat especially famous. When one group of prisoners  were able to escape on Pentecost 1941, one of the guys, Roger Bushell, was able to hide in the same hutch under the straw and muck, and got a head start by several hours. He escaped several hours before the rest of the group, and was able to head south.

The same goat was also featured in Thomas Killper’s art work next to the Kinderhaus (formerly Kommandur Haus). Look for #20 to see the goat and its hutch on the map.

This is a close-up of the actual art work. With this, the goat has become eternalized.

The location of this meadow with hutch can be found on the map, listed in the article ‘Flieger ohne Flügel’ (reprint S. 262). Number 7 on the map lists the ‘Sportplatz’ (sports field).

Today, the so-called goat farm is still green. It is part of the Camp-King Park, on the corner of Camp King Allee and Elvis-Presley-Weg. The park itself is almost 10 acres in size.

Corner of Camp King Allee and Elvis-Presley-Weg, entrance to the park

Camp-King Park in Oberursel

One feisty goat was enough to leave this little story behind.

Camp King Oberursel Memorabilia

While doing some research on Camp King Oberursel, I ended up on eBay. I was quite pleased to find something interesting, especially something I had not even been looking for.

cognac snifter Mountain Lodge, Oberursel

Back in 1990, this cognac glass, was given to Nicole Horn, then the reigning Brunnenkönigin (Fountain Queen) of Oberursel, by the Camp King post commander.

She sold it to me yesterday. Now I’m the lucky owner. It is made of very sturdy crystal with a hand-cut design.

 

POW Descendants Visit Camp King, Oberursel, Germany

As a member of the Camp King Historical Society, I occasionally write about the latest news, events, tours, etc.

That’s how Judy, a blog reader, found me and asked to enlist my help in getting a tour of the Camp King and the Klinik Hohemark from our historians, Mr. Kopp and Ms. Struck.

This is what Judy had to say:

My father was an American POW and spent time in the Hohe Mark hospital and Dulag Luft (later known as Camp King).  My son and I will be in the area touring sites connected to my father’s war experiences.

We leave for Koblenz right after our morning tour in Oberursel… and we are visiting a couple of different towns where my father’s plane crashed and where his crew member was buried.

Mr. Kopp, Judy and son Will, in the center, and Ms. Struck

The tour given by Mr. Kopp and Ms. Struck was a success, and later on I was able to catch up with our visitors as well.

Kuranstalt Hohe Mark, Oberursel

Hauptgebäude: main building

Kuranstalt: convalescent home

Based on my knowledge, this card dates back to about the 1930s.

Guided Tour Camp King, Oberursel on 25 March 2017

On Saturday, 25 March 2017, the guide Sylvia Struck is going to give a tour of the former U.S. military post Camp King in Oberursel.

Mountain Lodge, Camp King Oberursel

The tour covers the history of the area from the Reichssiedlungshof in the 1930s, through the time of the Dulag Luft, up to the end of the U.S. Army presence in 1992.

The meeting point is the Kinderhaus Camp King, Jean-Sauer-Weg 2  at 2 pm, and the tour costs 3 euro.
This is a good opportunity to learn more about the rich history of this area.

1970s Eateries on the Hohemarkstrasse near Camp King in Oberursel

A blog reader asked me for updates on the eateries on Hohemarkstraße he used to frequent in the 1970s.

He also wondered about several comments about a pizza shop on the corner of the street outside of Camp King. Did that use to be a sausage (bratwurst) place, before it became a pizza shop? 

He continued: I’m interested in finding out, if the pizzeria (outside the main gate, going to the left, towards down town) on the corner is the same place that the bratwurst place was, when I was there. If I didn’t like what we had in the mess hall, I would go outside the main gate for a bratwurst, mustard and a hard roll, if I didn’t go to the enlisted club to eat.

The pizzeria in your article*, I’m sure, is the same shop that was the worst shop in the 1971-73, when I was stationed at Camp King. I remember it was small inside and had small tables were you could stand and eat your sausage & hard roll. Also the shop was on the corner.
 
I was able to locate two eateries (a former drinking place and a current one), sitting at the corner of two streets off of Hohemarkstraße. The first one is this one at the right. The address is Hohemarkstraße 117.
When we came here in 1995, it was a drinking place run by a Greek immigrant. It closed about 2005, when the owner passed away. At the moment, it is an ice-cream parlor.
Driving up Hohemarkstraße, towards the hills and the sunset, you see a long yellow building along the road. This is where the former Camp King Post, now German settlement, begins.

A close-up of the same Eiscafé.

At another corner of Hohemarkstraße and Im Heidegraben, this building houses a shop facing Hohemarkstraße. Around the corner, there is this Treffpunkt (Meeting Point), where the local denizens of drink hang out. This kind of establishment is also called a Trinkhalle (tiny drinking place, in general).

Do the buildings spark any memories? If so, please let me know.