‘Studio Orschel’ Oberursel Featuring Contemporary Witnesses Live Stream on 10 May 2021

Tomorrow, 10 May 2021 at 20:15 local time, ‘Studio Orschel’ (Orschel means Oberursel in the local dialect) will be featuring two local contemporary witnesses, who experienced WWII in Oberursel as young boys.

When Germany capitulated – for Oberursel this was 30 March 1945 – American troops came to occupy the town. Mr. Manfred Kopp, our ‘Mister Camp King’, and Mr. Helmut Lind, will share their observations from that time.

It was not until 8 May 1985, when the term ‘Capitulation Day’ was changed to ‘Liberation Day’ by the former President Richard von Weizäcker. In his famous speech on that day, he became the first German Head of State to do so.

Mr. Kopp knows English well, so feel free to leave your questions and comments in the chat.

Manfred Kopp, Oberursel

To join this live stream on 10 May at 20:15 our local time Germany, visit:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHpseOTQqgX8364wh6sGASg

What Goes into the Used Clothing Recycling Containers in Oberursel

These pretty red used-clothes containers have been in place since at least 2014, when I last wrote about it here. There are 24 containers to be found throughout the city. Click here for a list of locations.

Altkleider Standort Im Rosengärtchen, Einkaufszentrum

Old clothes, old shoes, and home textiles can be disposed in these containers around 21 spots in the city. These red containers, depicting the famous ‘Wäschfraa-Brunnen(wash woman fountain) are usually located next to the used-glass containers (Altglas Container) and at the city’s recycling center.

Used-clothing container BSO Oberursel

Recently, this question of what happens to the clothing deposited there was directed to me, and my research about this topic answered some of my own questions too.

Yes, you can put in your frayed clothing, such as worn down socks with holes, a stained table cloth, torn curtains, and much more – as long as these items are not soiled.

For many years, I had been putting torn clothing and the likes directly into the waste bin, where they contribute to the global mountains of trash as well as air pollution when the trash goes up in flames.

From the recycling center’s website, I have this information about what happens to the donations after pick up. What happens to the used clothes?

Then click on (in German): Was passiert mit den Altkleidern? and you get the explanation in German.

A brief translation: The old clothes get recycled by the Bremer FWS-Boer-Gruppe. They get sorted in seven certified sorting centers in Germany, the Netherlands, and Belgium. Using 250 points of criteria, they are sorted by hand. This is done without chemical analyses or machines. Based on quality and demand, the next stop might be a second-hand shop, or a worldwide market. The final stage is going to the factory where non-wearable goods get further processed.

Here is a list of what goes in there: ✓ and what doesn’t: ✗


Altkleider Container List of Items

They take (✓list) : wearable clothes, underwear, towels, bed sheets and other household items (tea towels, etc.), blankets, bedding, goose-down feather bed covers, hats, caps, woolen hats, hand bags, belts, shoes of all kind (bundled in pairs) and plush animals.

They do not accept ( ✗ list): wet or dirty textiles, badly damaged textiles, fabric and yarn remnants, umbrellas, suitcases, baskets, carpets, mattresses.

All the other collection-bins or used-clothing containers (usually in plain white/grey) are run by various other organizations and charity groups. I have not seen a list attached to any of them, but it might be safe to assume the rules for acceptable items are similar.

To add a splash of color on your next shopping trip, have a look at these cute strawberry bags on Amazon: https://amzn.to/3hbdmc7

Sledding on the Mountain Lodge Hill in Oberursel, Germany

The last time we saw children sledding on the Mountain Lodge Hill in Oberursel must have been ten years ago.

If you are new the area, and need directions: This hill is in the housing area called Camp King, behind the EDEKA supermarket on Hohemarkstrasse, and in fairly close proximity to Frankfurt International School (FIS).

Oberursel, Germany

Buying a Christmas Tree from a Vendor near the Feldberg, Taunus

This past weekend, we drove up towards the Feldberg Mountain. Our usual vendor was closed, but there is always another one to choose from.

Heading towards the Feldberg, Taunus

I’m not picky about which tree to choose, but my husband is. I usually say yes to each one he picks up, as long as it isn’t so tall. Over the years, he has come down in size (the tree, that is), and our tree this year is ‘only’ 180-210cm (5’9″ – 6’9″) in height.

Christmas tree vendor near the Feldberg

The sign in the hut says, ‘Who cut one?’ indicating tree theft. We did not mention its other meaning in American slang. 🙂

Who cut one?

The vendor lady first approached me to offer assistance, but I pointed to my husband right away as the sole buyer.

Soon after, she was me telling about family feuds, tears, arguments, screaming, and whatever else might happen when families try to decide on a tree. She said, she had seen it all.

Here we are walking away with our 2020 Christmas tree.

Oberursel Pub Street in 1962

This photo, taken by a U.S. soldier in 1962, found its way back to Oberursel after more than 50 years.

At one time, this very street named Vorstadt had about 20 pubs and eateries.

In 1991, the guest house/pub Zum Bären was torn down to make room for the new shopping arcade Bären-Arkaden, named after the former guest house.

Gasthaus Zum Bären in Oberursel
Vorstadt Oberursel 1962

The same building also housed the first movie theater in Oberursel, which later became a discoteque.

The disco was known as High Life (1971-1975), and later as La Soirée (1975-1991).

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