What Goes into the Biomüll?

When you first arrive in Germany,  your new residence comes with quite a few new rules. Among them is the business of how to separate the trash.

Biomüll Tonnen

Some of you care to do so, so here is the list of waste items for the brown container (German: Biotonne):

  • kitchen waste – anything raw or cooked
  • vegetables and fruits (no citric fruits though)
  • cheese, fish, meat, bones, and cold cuts
  • egg shells and nut shells
  • milk, flour, and cereal products
  • dry goods having gone past the expiration date (without the packaging)
  • oils and fats (solidified)
  • coffee grounds, filter bags, tea bags, and tea leaves
  • paper towels, paper napkins, and tissues
  • newspaper used for wrapping
  • lawn cuttings
  • shrubs, fallen leaves, and bark
  • other organic waste, such as  hair, feathers, cat litter, wood shavings, and sawdust (only from untreated wood)
  •  hay, straw, and pots made of peat and cardboard

 

The Mountain Lodge at Camp King, Oberursel before its Major Renovation

A reader just asked me for photos of the Mountain Lodge, Camp King, in Oberursel before it was changed to this modernized state.

This might be an interesting visual tour for all the enlisted personnel, who were stationed at Camp King, but did not get to see the NCOs building from the inside.

Mountain Lodge, Camp King, Oberursel in August 2016

 

The photos below I took when the Candy Bomber paid us a visit back in June of 2013. The guest of honor at the tour and discussion was Col. Gail S. Halvorsen USAF (Ret.), one of the last surviving pilots of the Airlift.

This is a medley of interior photos. If anyone can help identify the location of some of the rooms, please share it under comments. I have posted the photos in the same way I walked through the house.

Attic of the Mountain Lodge, Camp King Oberursel

 

Open House at the Mountain Lodge, Camp King

 

 

Hallway at the Mountain Lodge, Camp King in Oberursel

Manfred Kopp and the Candy Bomber, June 2013

Hope you’ve enjoyed this tour.

First Graders and Paper Cones in Germany

If you see an elementary student, holding proudly a big paper cone filled with presents, then you know it is the very first day of school here in Hesse.

Most Germans see this is a serious affair – this is when ‘Der Ernst des Lebens beginnt’ (The serious side of life begins). Some moms even cry, because they worry about their children and the ‘serious effects’ school could have on them.

On the other hand, when our international kids started school, we were so happy and pleased to have come so far. We told them to enjoy school and the healthy and fun environment provided by good educators.

If you want to know more about the origin of the Schultüte, visit: http://m.dw.com/en/why-germans-give-their-kids-paper-cones-on-the-first-day-of-school/a-19492362

This shows me on my first day of school. Back in 1967, cones were usually filled with essentials mostly, such as school supplies, but also a few sweets. My home state of Bavaria starts the new school year very late by mid-September, hence the warmer clothing.

My first day of school in September 1967

My first day of school in September 1967

ACTA and its Purpose

What I had earlier disregarded as a hype on the internet, has changed after watching this clip. It was informative and ACTAs purpose was well illustrated. A couple of times though, the word choice was a bit too attention-grabbing. Nevertheless, I recommend watching it.

Definitions cited from the clip provider:

ACTA – ‘The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement’ is a proposed plurilateral agreement for the purpose of establishing international standards on intellectual property rights enforcement.

ACTA would establish a new international legal framework that would create its “own governing body outside existing international institutions” such as – the World Trade Organization (WTO), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) or the United Nations.

Watch this to learn more about ACTA and its possible trails: