Christmas Card Greeting in the Old German Handwriting

This postcard, written in Suetterlin, dates back to a time between 1915 and 1941, when Suetterlin was widely in use.

This form of modern handwriting was introduced by the ministry to be used in offices and schools.

After I learned Latin letters in first grade, the following year (or maybe third grade), we also had to learn to write in Suetterlin style. It is very useful to know now – when browsing archives and old documents in my research.

Gesegnete Weihnacht! = Have a blessed Christmas!

Gesegnete Weihnacht by Margret Savelsberg

 

I wish all my readers a blissful year-end season, filled with bright lights and happy memories to reflect on.

“I am grateful for all the moments that I have, and I’m moving forward one step at a time to the future.”  – Park Bo-gum (ë°•ë³´ê²€)

 

Old German Handwriting in the Classroom

This Old German cursive was taught in most German schools from 1915 – 1941.

To create a modern handwriting script, now known as the Sütterlinschrift (Old German hand), the graphic artist Ludwig Sütterlin was commissioned by the Prussian Ministry of Science in 1911.

When the Nazi Party banned Sütterlin, it was replaced it with Latin-type letters. However, many German speakers, such as the generation before me, had been taught only Sütterlin and therefore continued to use it well into the post-war period.

In 3rd grade, we had to learn Sütterlin, a mandatory part our our education. I’m very glad I learned it, because later in life, I was able to decipher old postcards, my father’s documents, and so much more.

I found this Deutsche Schrift (Old German writings) teaching supply at a private flea market in Oberursel the other day. It had come from an elementary school in Oestrich-Winkel (near Rüdesheim), where the seller’s father had worked as the Hausmeister (maintenance man) for many years. When the archives had to be cleared, he was given permission to take this one home.

Now I’ve got it hanging at my place of work.

Deutsche Schrift in der Grundschule

Deutsche Schrift in der Grundschule

Hessische Lehrmittel (Hessian teaching material), rolled up, with yellowed paper on the back

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