War Stories and Camp King Oberursel

Several years ago, a friend of mine introduced me to one of her British friends, Nicola, in front of the EDEKA supermarket, located on the former Camp King areal in Oberursel. Imagine my surprise when she stated she knew me from reading my blog.

The photo below shows Camp King before most of the reconstruction began. Notice, there is no shopping center yet and much of the townhouse building still had to take place.

Of the five military housing buildings, there are only two remaining – the two most outer ones. The three buildings in the center all had to go.

Anyway, Nicola used to live in the new Camp King residential area until last year and then went off to the U.S.A.

Camp King, with its rich history, is often talked about. A while back, Nicola sent me this BBC link, which her sister discovered while doing genealogy.

Her sister found out that her grandfather’s cousin, Squadron Leader H.D.H. (Douglas) Cooper, had been taken to Oberursel as a POW. This is not only the same town Nicola had just left, but her home used to be on the very same ground, Camp King, where her D. Cooper once had been interrogated.

Quoting:… From Hamburg, Cooper was taken to a reception centre for prisoners of war at Dulag Luft in Oberusel. He was soon moved on …

See full article on BBC.co.uk.WW2peopleswarstories.

I was reminded of this comprehensive website again, because our local Camp King historian, Mr. Kopp, and I had a brief meeting earlier today.

Another book, by an American author, is in the making and a couple of chapters will include the early years of American occupation at Camp King. More about this later.

 

Reading Books in Print or Screen

As a private teacher, I have a little library full of Dr. Seuss, Sesame Street, and Mister and Miss Books, among hundreds of others. I still read the old-fashioned way, because I am happy holding a paper book in my hand. My Landsmann Johannes Gutenberg would be pleased with me.

On the other hand, I need to be informed of what other means of reading devices are available today.

Fortunately, I found a very useful article, comparing all possible reading devices, such as the Amazon Kindle, the first – and second generation iPads, Barnes & Noble’s Nook, an iPhone, a Windows Phone, a phone using Google’s Android system, an Android tablet and a laptop computer, in last week’s edition of the New York Times.

Last, but not least, the author also used a regular paperback book to compare.

I am not ready yet to change my reading habits, but reading screens for everyone are on the visible horizon.

If you need any advice on what to purchase for your reading, then read Nick Bilton’s evaluation Deciding on a Book, and How to Read It.

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