What Goes into the Used Clothing Recycling Containers in Oberursel

These pretty red used-clothes containers have been in place since at least 2014, when I last wrote about it here. There are 24 containers to be found throughout the city. Click here for a list of locations.

Altkleider Standort Im Rosengärtchen, Einkaufszentrum

Old clothes, old shoes, and home textiles can be disposed in these containers around 21 spots in the city. These red containers, depicting the famous ‘Wäschfraa-Brunnen(wash woman fountain) are usually located next to the used-glass containers (Altglas Container) and at the city’s recycling center.

Used-clothing container BSO Oberursel

Recently, this question of what happens to the clothing deposited there was directed to me, and my research about this topic answered some of my own questions too.

Yes, you can put in your frayed clothing, such as worn down socks with holes, a stained table cloth, torn curtains, and much more – as long as these items are not soiled.

For many years, I had been putting torn clothing and the likes directly into the waste bin, where they contribute to the global mountains of trash as well as air pollution when the trash goes up in flames.

From the recycling center’s website, I have this information about what happens to the donations after pick up. What happens to the used clothes?

Then click on (in German): Was passiert mit den Altkleidern? and you get the explanation in German.

A brief translation: The old clothes get recycled by the Bremer FWS-Boer-Gruppe. They get sorted in seven certified sorting centers in Germany, the Netherlands, and Belgium. Using 250 points of criteria, they are sorted by hand. This is done without chemical analyses or machines. Based on quality and demand, the next stop might be a second-hand shop, or a worldwide market. The final stage is going to the factory where non-wearable goods get further processed.

Here is a list of what goes in there: ✓ and what doesn’t: ✗


Altkleider Container List of Items

They take (✓list) : wearable clothes, underwear, towels, bed sheets and other household items (tea towels, etc.), blankets, bedding, goose-down feather bed covers, hats, caps, woolen hats, hand bags, belts, shoes of all kind (bundled in pairs) and plush animals.

They do not accept ( ✗ list): wet or dirty textiles, badly damaged textiles, fabric and yarn remnants, umbrellas, suitcases, baskets, carpets, mattresses.

All the other collection-bins or used-clothing containers (usually in plain white/grey) are run by various other organizations and charity groups. I have not seen a list attached to any of them, but it might be safe to assume the rules for acceptable items are similar.

To add a splash of color on your next shopping trip, have a look at these cute strawberry bags on Amazon: https://amzn.to/3hbdmc7

List of Old Restaurants, Pubs, and Bistros in Oberursel, Germany

If you are looking for a certain pub in Oberursel you e.g. frequented in the 1970s, you will probably find it here: http://www.ursella.info/Gasthaus/files/Findbuch-Gaststaetten-nach-Strassen-_01_10_2017_fin.pdf

This is the most comprehensive list on former and current restaurants, pub, bistros, cafés, for Oberursel ever to be published.

Credits go to Ms. Heidi Decher.

Marktplatz Oberursel
Oberursel Marktplatz

List of Expensive Verbal Insults for Drivers in Germany

So you think your German is not good enough to insult others, well, your hand gesture (the middle finger, e.g.) might be enough for you to be fined by the authorities.

Against common belief, there is no difference in whether you insult a police offer or any other person on the street, the charges remain the same. The charge only differs based on the offender’s income and social standing.

For example, a few years back, a famous German soccer player was fined € 10.000 for calling someone an ‘Arschloch’. An average worker would have gotten away with a much lower fine.

This is a shortlist of the most common insults, which come with a €1.000 fine:

  • “Arschloch”, “Drecksau”
  • “Wichser”, “Scheißwichser”
  • “Blöde Schlampe”, “alte Schlampe”
  • “Schlampen, ihr elendigen!”
  • “Sie haben den totalen Knall”
  • Sie sind “blöd im Kopf”
  • “Verbrecherin”, “blöde Kuh”
  • “Arschloch” plus showing the middle finger

Insults are not a trivial offense, but a criminal one, based on German law. This can lead to hefty fines or imprisonment.

On the other hand, the statements/name calling listed below remain free of charge:

  • “Sie können mich mal …”
  • “Oberförster”, “Wegelagerer” oder “Komischer Vogel” to a  police officer
  • “Leck mich am Arsch!” (if used around the Stuttgart area)
  • “Das ist doch Korinthenkackerei” (when arguing about a parking ticket)
  • “Parkplatzschwein” to a person parking in a non-parking zone.

Source: German ADAC – March 2019

Avoid road rage (lovely long German term: im Straßenverkehr ausbrechender Jähzorn), and keep cool.

Old Bakery at the Market Square in Oberursel

This former bakery (grey half-timbered house) at the market square in Oberursel first opened its doors for business on 14 Oct 1888. The first owner was Ferdinand Will.

Announcement in the paper ‘Bürgerfreund’

 

 

From the archives:

Marktplatz 13 Bäckerei Ferdinand Will 1904

Marktplatz 13 Bäckerei Müller H. 1936

Marktplatz 13 Bäckerei Horn Georg, 01.03.1939 – 31.10.1949

Marktplatz 13 Bäckerei Stenzel Kurt 1953

Credits go to H. Decher for her research and sharing the photos.

List of German Wedding Anniversaries and Their Symbols

A couple of years ago, we celebrated our 25-year anniversary, a.k.a. silver wedding anniversary. In the Holy Roman Empire, a husband would crown his wife with a silver wreath on their twenty-fifth anniversary, hence the silver.

In Germany, we have the following symbols assigned to each anniversary.

The Wedding Anniversary Guide
  • 1st Anniversary: Paper
  • 2nd Anniversary: Cotton
  • 3rd Anniversary: Leather
  • 4th Anniversary: Silk
  • 5th Anniversary: Wood
  • 6th Anniversary: Sugar
  • 7th Anniversary: Copper
  • 8th Anniversary: Tin
  • 9th Anniversary: Ceramics
  • 10th Anniversary: Rose

 

  • 11th Anniversary: Steel
  • 12th Anniversary: Nickel
  • 12 1/2 Anniversary: Parsley
  • 13th Anniversary: Violet
  • 14th Anniversary: Ivory
  • 15th Anniversary: Crystal
  • 16th Anniversary: Sapphire
  • 17th Anniversary: Orchid
  • 18th Anniversary: Turquoise
  • 19th Anniversary: Abalone
  • 20th Anniversary: Porcelain

 

  • 21st Anniversary: Opal
  • 22nd Anniversary: Bronze
  • 23rd Anniversary: Titan
  • 24th Anniversary: Satin
  • 25th Anniversary: Silver
  • 26th Anniversary: Jade
  • 27th Anniversary: Mahogany
  • 28th Anniversary: Carnation
  • 29th Anniversary: Velvet
  • 30th Anniversary: Pearl

 

  • 31st Anniversary: Basswood
  • 32nd Anniversary: Soap
  • 33rd Anniversary: Pewter
  • 34th Anniversary: Amber
  • 35th Anniversary: Canvas
  • 36th Anniversary: Emerald
  • 37th Anniversary: Machalit
  • 37 1/2 Anniversary: Aluminum
  • 38th Anniversary: Fire
  • 39th Anniversary: Sun
  • 40th Anniversary: Ruby

This coming September, we will celebrate our Carnation Wedding Anniversary. The carnation flower in itself has a slightly morbid association in Germany – they often serve  as funeral flowers.

White carnations symbolize not eternal fidelity, but they also represent the nails used at the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

Fortunately, its German counterpart ‘Nelke’ not only means carnation, but also clove (as in Gewürznelke).