Photos of Camp King in Oberursel

A stateside reader of my post Zum Fuchstanz near Oberursel/Feldberg wrote that he had been living in Camp King in the 60s and was interested in its progress. And as I live so close to this former military camp – I can see it from my kitchen window – I sometimes tend to forget its historical significance.

Back in the 1960s, only fields and meadows separated the northern end of the camp from the Feldberg mountain. On those same fields, the German development “Im Rosengärtchen” was constructed in 1972, and this is where I am sitting and writing this post while facing the Feldberg mountain on this overcast day.

To revisit Camp King’s history, I took another walk through the area to take some photos.

One of the two buildings left on the northern end of the camp, which is facing the Feldberg mountain.

One of the two buildings left on the northern end of the camp, which is facing the Feldberg mountain.

The extended yard has been replaced by a narrow parking strip. Gone are the old trees!

The extended yard has been replaced by a narrow parking strip. Gone are the old trees!

Housing was built away from the main road (Hohemarkstrasse), but now has been filled in by a commercial building.

U.S. housing had been built away from the main road (Hohemarkstrasse), but now the space has been filled in by a commercial building.

Connecting the old with the new... I pass through this passage way everytime on my way to the super market.

Connecting the old with the new… I walk through this passage on my way to the super market.

Looking from the northern end building onto what used to be farmers's fields. The big housing yard is still there, but the view to the Feldberg is obstructed by this 1972 German housing project.

Looking from the northern end building onto what used to be farmers’ fields. Note: the big yard still is there, which must be the envy of the German neighbors with their Lilliputian plots.

Walking towards the end of the camp where the officers' housing used to be.

Walking towards the end of the camp where the administrative buildings and officers’ housing used to be.

A bit of nature left within the area for summer outings.

A bit of nature remains for summer outings.

Restored half-timbered house up on the hill

Yet unrestored half-timbered building up on the hill.

Old and new mixed in Camp King

Old and new mixed in Camp King

The camp was named after Colonel Charles B. King on 19.09.1946.

The camp was named after Colonel Charles B. King on 19.09.1946.

The former basketball gym's wooden floor was turned into a woodcarving by Thomas Kilpper. It is called "Don't look back" and tells Camp King's history.

The former basketball gym’s wooden floor was turned into a woodcarving and preserved by Thomas Kilpper, whose artwork tells the history of the camp.  He titled it “Don’t Look Back”.

To learn more about Oberursel and its Camp King history, visit Oberursel Today or you might like to join me on a walk through Camp King via podcast.

Camp King’s American Street Names

I remember chuckling a bit when an acquaintance told me of his new address: Elvis-Presley-Weg in Camp King, Oberursel. Well, in the U.S.A. his face even made it onto a stamp. Germans can be a bit more conservative in their choice of street names for new settlements (preferred categories are rivers, flowers, trees, composers, etc.)

Anyway, these three American street names were chosen, among others, by the local magistrate and serve as a good reminder of the former U.S. military occupation here in Oberursel. And having passed by this road sign for a few years, I find nothing unusual about it anymore.

Elvis Presley Way - with one of the only two original U.S. housing buildings still standing (facing Hohemarkstrasse)

Entering Camp King from Hohemarkstrasse

Entering Camp King from Hohemarkstrasse

George-C.-Marshall-Ring was given to the only other original U.S. housing building. From there, this street name runs thought a big part of the new German housing area.