The Mountain Lodge at Camp King, Oberursel, in June 2020

Over the years, we have taken many walks around our neighborhood, Camp King. There is relatively little traffic, and a nice park to walk through.

Steps leading towards the Mountain Lodge, Camp King Oberursel
Mountain Lodge at Camp King Oberursel

The left side is the meadow, which slopes down from the Mountain Lodge. The right side shows part of the public park.

We consider ourselves fortunate to be living here in this part of Oberursel.

Honoring Colonel Charles B. King at Camp King, Oberursel, on V-E Day 2020

A small token of remembrance – flowers and candles have been put in front of the monument dedicated to Colonel Charles B. King at Camp King, Oberursel on 8 May 2020.

Homeschooling in Germany has Become Legal Now

“Der Schulzwang wird fallen wie die Berliner Mauer” (source: Bildungsvielfalt) stands for Compulsory education will eventually [sic] fall like the Berlin Wall. This has happened now.

Now, without further ado in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, homeschooling is suddenly the norm. Everyone in Germany is getting home schooled – without any bureaucracy.

1919 saw the beginning of Compulsory Education (Schulpflicht) in Germany. Over the years, there had been various appeals by individuals and petitioners to change the law.

In April 2010, a petition signed by 5400 people, was submitted to the German Bundestag asking for impunity for parents who teach their children at home. This petition was turned down in November 2011.

I had supported this petition back in 2009, and had published this post: Petition for Homeschooling in Germany

Homeschooling in German: der Hausunterricht or der Heimunterricht

Life in Germany in the Time of Corona

My favorite word right now is fiddlefart*. I’ve got so much time on my hands, and I actually work through my to-do list, but there is not much to show for. This gives me an early taste of what retiring might look like.

I’m on Day 5 now, and we are still free to move. But there are restrictions, and as time passes, there are more to come.

Outdoor facilities such as playgrounds, pools, etc. are closed. This photo shows the playground at Camp King, with a red and white barrier tape at Camp King.

This morning at the super market seemed a normal one. Searching for batteries, I turned the corner into another aisle, and was reprimanded by someone in a closely standing group of three: “Bitte Abstand halten!” (Keep your distance!). Sure, this makes sense. Not.

I just nodded, smiled, and approached the batteries from the other end. The group remained there, and continued talking without keeping distance. Ja, ja, the little policemen are out there. 🙂

Some customers kept the recommended distance while waiting in line. One lady though was almost breathing down my neck, and before I could turn around to say something, her husband pointed it out to her. She then retracted, but not without chiding him first.

I saw an appeal on social media about giving health care workers, and all others assisting in this time of crisis, a big shout-out by applauding. This is supposed to happen by the open window, or balcony, every evening at 9pm. So far I have not heard anything around here.

This coming Sunday, 22 March at 18:00, a Flash-Mob from your Balcony event is planned. We are supposed to hear: Beethovens Schlusschoral Freude Schöner Götterfunken (Beethoven’s final chorale on Ode to Joy).

More information in German here:
Hessischer Musikverband e.V.

These are interesting times.

* to fiddlefart (verb): to linger aimlessly; to look busy while accomplishing nothing.

New Year’s Day 2020 in Germany: What a Waste!

Millions of Euros are wasted every New Year’s Eve (the previous year, 2018, Germans spent €133 million on fireworks).

Ever so efficient, all public spaces have the waste removed before the following work day, 2 January.

These photos were taken at the EDEKA supermarket parking lot on the former military post Camp King in Oberursel.

“Water and air, the two essential fluids on which all life depends, have become global garbage cans.”

― Jacques-Ives Cousteau

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