Easter Egg Decorations in Germany

We have just returned from a visit to my hometown in Franconia (northern Bavaria). In those rural parts of Germany, where traditions and customs are still more present, we passed by some interesting Easter decorations in the middle of the villages.

Our first stop was in Zeilitzheim to buy some wine from Wein von 3.

Our second stop was in Schonungen, where we rented a vacation apartment at Ferienwohnung Gräf for two days.

Another stop was in the village of Hambach, where I grew up, and we went to visit my parents’ grave.

This tradition is a beautiful spring marker, and I hope there will always be enough volunteers to continue this.

What Goes into the Biomüll?

When you first arrive in Germany,  your new residence comes with quite a few new rules. Among them is the business of how to separate the trash.

Biomüll Tonnen

Some of you care to do so, so here is the list of waste items for the brown container (German: Biotonne):

  • kitchen waste – anything raw or cooked
  • vegetables and fruits (no citric fruits though)
  • cheese, fish, meat, bones, and cold cuts
  • egg shells and nut shells
  • milk, flour, and cereal products
  • dry goods having gone past the expiration date (without the packaging)
  • oils and fats (solidified)
  • coffee grounds, filter bags, tea bags, and tea leaves
  • paper towels, paper napkins, and tissues
  • newspaper used for wrapping
  • lawn cuttings
  • shrubs, fallen leaves, and bark
  • other organic waste, such as  hair, feathers, cat litter, wood shavings, and sawdust (only from untreated wood)
  •  hay, straw, and pots made of peat and cardboard

 

German Word for the Day: die Waldeinsamkeit

Waldeinsamkeit (lit: forest solitude) stands for the feeling of being alone in the woods, but it also implies our connection to nature and the universe.

Erst im Wald kam alles zur Ruhe in mir, meine Seele wurde ausgeglichen und voller Macht.

– – Knut Hamsun

It was only in the forest that everything came to rest, my soul became balanced and full of strength.

German Lesson: der Schießstand

Many German learners have a difficult time differentiating the sound difference between the diphthongs ‘ie‘ and ‘ei‘. If the learners have an Anglo or ESL background, I advise them to read only the second diphthong vowel in English. That way, it comes out as the proper German pronunciation.

The word ‘Schießstand’ [ʃiːs] means shooting range.

If mispronounced as ‘Scheißstand’ [ʃaɪz], then you are talking about a shitting range. Whatever that means.

Schießstand

Schießstand

This sign is in Oberursel, pointing towards the shooting range, and if you proceed, you will also get to the animal shelter in the forest.

English Lesson: to Have Green Fingers

The idiom to have green fingers/to have a green thumb means to be good at growing plants.

This photo shows the lily-of-the-valley plant I had received by mail from Switzerland, and last year’s traditional New Year’s Eve present: Glücksklee (four-leaved clover, also: lucky clover). Both ended dried up and so I dumped them in the box on the balcony. They both love it there.

das Maiglöckchen (lily-of-the-valley) + der Glücksklee (lucky clover)

Glücksklee

My better half asked me to germinate the pumpkin seeds he specifically ordered from the U.S. In the end, we had eight pumpkins inhabiting the balcony floor. I was glad when harvest time came around, and I could stop side-stepping. 🙂

 der Kürbis (pumpkin)

Kürbis

This sunflower was brought to us by the birds.

 die Sonnenblume (sunflower)

Sonnenblume

I don’t use fertilizer. Everything green on my balcony needs to pass the Darwinian test.