List of Expensive Verbal Insults for Drivers in Germany

So you think your German is not good enough to insult others, well, your hand gesture (the middle finger, e.g.) might be enough for you to be fined by the authorities.

Against common belief, there is no difference in whether you insult a police offer or any other person on the street, the charges remain the same. The charge only differs based on the offender’s income and social standing.

For example, a few years back, a famous German soccer player was fined € 10.000 for calling someone an ‘Arschloch’. An average worker would have gotten away with a much lower fine.

This is a shortlist of the most common insults, which come with a €1.000 fine:

  • “Arschloch”, “Drecksau”
  • “Wichser”, “Scheißwichser”
  • “Blöde Schlampe”, “alte Schlampe”
  • “Schlampen, ihr elendigen!”
  • “Sie haben den totalen Knall”
  • Sie sind “blöd im Kopf”
  • “Verbrecherin”, “blöde Kuh”
  • “Arschloch” plus showing the middle finger

Insults are not a trivial offense, but a criminal one, based on German law. This can lead to hefty fines or imprisonment.

On the other hand, the statements/name calling listed below remain free of charge:

  • “Sie können mich mal …”
  • “Oberförster”, “Wegelagerer” oder “Komischer Vogel” to a  police officer
  • “Leck mich am Arsch!” (if used around the Stuttgart area)
  • “Das ist doch Korinthenkackerei” (when arguing about a parking ticket)
  • “Parkplatzschwein” to a person parking in a non-parking zone.

Source: German ADAC – March 2019

Avoid road rage (lovely long German term: im Straßenverkehr ausbrechender Jähzorn), and keep cool.

Rights of School Age Children in Germany

Over the years, I have been questioned about several issues related to minors’ rights in Germany by ex-pat parents and students alike.

Here is a short summary:

  • Germany has a compulsory school attendance law, which requires all children between the ages of six to fifteen to attend school.
  • Germany is a member of the Global Conventions Act, that protect the rights of children. This entitles them to a childhood free of emotional, mental, and physical abuse. *
  • Children under 15 may not be employed. Exceptions are made for minor jobs such as newspaper delivery routes, babysitting, taking care of pets, or other tasks which are not dangerous.
  • At the age of 14, when in presence of parents or guardians, minors are allowed to consumer beer and wine.
  • At the age of 16, minors are allowed to buy and consume beer and wine.
  • At the age of 18, they are of legal age. Therefore, they can buy and consumer beer, wine, and distilled liquor.

*More about this at Children’s Rights: Germany

Disclaimer: The information contained in this post is for general information purposes only. My blog Pension Sprachschule assumes no responsibility for errors or omissions in the contents on the service.

Fasching 2019 in Oberursel

Hold on to your neckties today, because today’s Weiberfastnacht is the official beginning of the final culmination of Fasching. Dates vary every year (based on the Easter holiday), but these final days of celebrations always go from Thursday until Tuesday. This makes it six days of partytime for some.

On today’s Weiberfastnacht, ladies may cut off your tie. Wherever you are.

Many public and private parties are taking place, so there will be more random police checks on the roads this weekend.

Fasching in Oberursel

On Sunday, 3 March, take your children to the Faschingsparade in downtown Oberursel. The starting time for the parade is always 14:11.

For some pointers on what to do or what to bring, read my previous post Fasching Parade Oberursel.

 

Best 29 Beautiful German Words

Some of these words such as Kuttelmuttel (chaotic situation), Remmidemmi (noisy get-together), we often hear.

Others such as Mumpitz (nonsensical stuff), I’ve only heard once in my life.

Choose your favorites, and don’t forget to practice by saying them out loud.

Visit https://www.buzzfeed.com/de/philippjahner/schoene-deutsche-woerter to the see the list of the best 29 most beautiful German words.

Guerilla Knitting at the Exeter University Forum

Guerilla Knitting is still alive! At least at the Exeter University Forum.

Back in 2011, while the husband and son were touring the U.K. for prospective universities, the rest of the family stayed behind in a rental in Bournemouth. During that time, I had so much fun adorning knitting and tying these to lamp posts, benches, and many other places. And for yarn, I used the colours of the British flag.

I tried the same thing here in Oberursel in the Rosengärtchen, but our building supervisor service (similar to a Hausmeister) immediately removed my little pieces of artful annoyances. This went on for a few days, and I gave up. This is proper Germany, and I had the Knit Graffiti Polizei on my heels… 🙂

So I was pleased to see this photo my daughter sent me today.

Guerilla Knitting in Exeter, U.K.

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